Granules

Granular formulations are similar to dust formulations except granular particles are larger and heavier. The coarse particles are made from materials such as clay, corncobs, peanut hulls, walnut shells, wood fibre or recycled newspaper. The active ingredient either coats the outside of the granules or is absorbed into them. The amount of active ingredient is relatively low, usually ranging from less than 1 to 15 percent by weight.

Granular pesticides are most often used to apply chemicals to the soil to control weeds, fire ants, nematodes, and insects living in the soil or for absorption into plants through the roots. Granular formulations are sometimes applied by airplane or helicopter to minimize drift or to penetrate dense vegetation. Once applied, granules release the active ingredient slowly. Some granules require soil moisture to release the active ingredient. Granular formulations also are used to control larval mosquitoes and other aquatic pests. Granules are used in agricultural, structural, ornamental, turf, aquatic, right-of-way, and public health (biting insect) pest control operations.

Advantages of granular formulations include:

  • Ready to use—no mixing
  • Drift hazard is low, and particles settle quickly
  • Little hazard to applicator—no spray, little dust
  • Weight carries the formulation through foliage to soil or water target
  • Simple application equipment needed, such as seeders or fertilizer spreaders
  • May break down more slowly than WPs or ECs because of a slow-release coating

Their disadvantages:

  • Often difficult to calibrate equipment and apply uniformly
  • Will not stick to foliage or other uneven surfaces
  • May need to be incorporated into soil or planting medium
  • May need moisture to activate pesticide
  • May be hazardous to nontarget species, especially waterfowl and other birds that mistakenly feed on the seed-like granules
  • May not be effective under drought conditions because the active ingredient is not released in sufficient quantity to control the pest
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